Book List Challenge

A few days ago, our blogger friend Nicole posted her list of personal book likings and dislikings. She took her cue from Lynn over at Violins and Starships, which should win best blog name on the interwebs. Anyway, reading books is something I love to do. I also love to make art out of them, but that’s for another blog.

1. Your favorite book: Soooooo difficult, but I really can’t pick just one.

2. Your least favorite book: In the last decade, that would be The Da Vinci Code. I wanted to throw it away by the end of the second chapter.

3. A book that completely surprised you (bad or good): Hm…. I would have to say I didn’t expect to like The Giver, by Lois Lowry. I read it since Eldest was assigned the book for school, and found it well-written, even for adults.

4. A book that reminds you of home: Postal de Tierra Adentro (Postcard from the Inner Land), by C. O. Padilla. Literally, a book about my hometown.

5. A non-fiction book that you actually enjoyed: The Monuments Men, by Robert Edsel.

6. A book that makes you cry: A Knight in Shining Armor, by Jude Deveraux. Yes, it’s a romance novel. But I found the concept of souls meeting again, instead of bodies, to be enchanting.

7. A book that’s hard to read: Ulysses, by James Joyce. GAH!!

8. An unpopular book you believe should be a bestseller: I don’t really know of any.

9. A book you’ve read more than once: All of them, except Pet Sematary.

10. The first novel you remember reading: The Secret of the Old Clock, by Carolyn Keene. Yes, Nancy Drew was my portal into the world of reading.

11. The book that made you fall in love with reading: The Mysterious Affair at Styles, by Agatha Christie.

12. A book so emotionally draining you couldn’t complete it or had to set it aside for a bit: Unwind, by Neal Schusterman.

13. Favorite childhood book: Fox in Socks, by Dr. Seuss. Why? Because it helped me learn English.

14. Book that should be on a high school or college required reading list: Any and all of the Politically Incorrect Guides.

15. Favorite book dealing with foreign culture: Anthropology, by Alfred Kroeber. As old as it is, it is still considered a masterpiece in the field. Outdated, and some of it debunked, it offers a fascinating window into the study of cultures.

16. Favorite book turned movie: Hm, can’t think of any that stand out.

17. Book turned movie and completely desecrated: Starship Troopers, by Robert Heinlein. *sobs*

18. A book you can’t find on shelves anymore that you love: None come to mind.

19. A book that changed your mind about a particular subject (non-fiction): The Art of War, by Sun Tzu.

20. A book you would recommend to an ignorant/racist/closed-minded person: On the very cold, remote, off-chance anyone of that temperament would take any advice from me, I would recommend The Story Bible, by Pearl S. Buck.

21. A guilty pleasure book: Everything by Teresa Medeiros. Yes, bodice-rippers, but with a lot of humor.

22. Favorite series: I have quite a few. Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling, Paladin series by John Ringo, Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich, Richard Jury series by Martha Grimes (though I stopped at The Case is Altered because it got a bit ridiculous).

23. Favorite romance novel: Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte. They love so much and so deeply, it turns to hate and destroys them and they all die. Awesomeness!

24. A book you later found out the author lied about: I’m with Nicole on this. I don’t watch or listen to Oprah Winfrey.

25. Favorite autobiographical/biographical book: Me,  by Katherine Hepburn.

26. A book you wish would be written: Where Do We Go From Here? A Study in Fractal Time Travel Through Heaven and Hell.

27. A book you would write if you had all the resources: See above.

28. A book you wish you never read: Pet Sematary, by Stephen King. I need to turn all the lights on now.

29. An author that you completely avoid/hate/won’t read: Nicholas Sparks. James Joyce. E L James.

30. An author that you will read whatever they put out: Neil Gaiman. John Ringo. Brad Thor. Teresa Medeiros.

Well, that does it for me. I hope some of y’all pick up the challenge and post it on your blogs. It will be fun to see what other books are out there for us to enjoy.

Or to revile 😉

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About LC Aggie Sith

Machete-wielding zombie killer when not a stay-at-home mom. View all posts by LC Aggie Sith

21 responses to “Book List Challenge

  • Reiuxcat

    1. Your favorite book: I’ll pick a genre and author; sci-fi & Larry Niven

    2. Your least favorite book: The Feminine Mystique by Freidan (college assignment)

    3. A book that completely surprised you ( good): King Henry VIII by Jasper Ridley

    4. A book that reminds you of home: True Women

    5. A non-fiction book that you actually enjoyed: The Coldest Winter in Peking

    6. A book that makes you cry: The Prague Spring

    7. A book that’s hard to read: Beowulf

    8. An unpopular book you believe should be a bestseller: ?

    9. A book you’ve read more than once: All of them, except The Plague by Camus.

    10. The first novel you remember reading: One of many Hardy Boys (The first sci-fi book was by Andre Norton)

  • navigator1965

    M’Lady Sith, you are just too wonderful. I loved the book “Starship Troopers” (and other early Heinlein) as a pre-teen/young teen. I’ve also read “The Art of War” and have actually applied the teachings of Sun Tzu, which I recount in my forthcoming book.

    Which, BTW, seems to very much be a non-fiction book that test readers love: http://navigator1965.wordpress.com/2014/03/31/how-to-write-the-book-that-malcolm-gladwell-wished-he-had-written/ (see test reader comments at the end of the post).

    I’d be really interested to see if it could compete for top spot on #25.

  • Clete Orris

    Thanks for making me feel like a Philistine

  • Nicole

    Nice list. 🙂 Some books on there I need to check out. And I adored Nancy Drew as a kid!

  • Azygos

    And I just know you are going to run right out and see The Monuments Men with George whatshisname?

    Ducks and runs….

  • Critter

    1. Your favorite book: Depends on the genre

    2. Your least favorite book: Wuthering Heights

    3. A book that completely surprised you (bad or good): The first Wilbur Smith novel I read, Monsoon. Much better than anticipated.

    4. A book that reminds you of home: I dunno

    5. A non-fiction book that you actually enjoyed: Is there any other kind?

    6. A book that makes you cry: ???

    7. A book that’s hard to read: Some of the 19th century stuff where the author expects their audience to be fluent in several languages and so some of the quotes aren’t translated. Very frustrating.

    8. An unpopular book you believe should be a bestseller: Beats me.

    9. A book you’ve read more than once: The Lord of the Rings

    10. The first novel you remember reading: A YA version of the Tales of Robin Hood.

    11. The book that made you fall in love with reading: L’Mort d’Arthur and The LongShips (several viking sagas)

    12. A book so emotionally draining you couldn’t complete it or had to set it aside for a bit: people do this?

    13. Favorite childhood book: Fox in Socks, by Dr. Seuss.

    14. Book that should be on a high school or college required reading list: a lot of basic economics.

    15. Favorite book dealing with foreign culture: The Barry Hughart stories of Master Li Kao and his assistant, Number Ten Ox.

    16. Favorite book turned movie: The Narnia stories

    17. Book turned movie and completely desecrated: Starship Troopers, by Robert Heinlein. *sobs* (The Hobbit isn’t finished yet, but is so off the rails already that I grieve)

    18. A book you can’t find on shelves anymore that you love: Rude Tales, and Glorious!

    19. A book that changed your mind about a particular subject (non-fiction): The Art of War, by Sun Tzu, The Prince, by Machiavelli, A History of War, by John Keegan, The Peleponisian War, by Thucydides

    20. A book you would recommend to an ignorant/racist/closed-minded person: Shooting To Live, by Sykes/Fairbairn

    21. A guilty pleasure book: the Jack Reacher books by Lee Child. Pure brain potato chips.

    22. Favorite series: Hammer’s Slammers, by David Drake, the Marcus Didius Falco stories by Linsey Graham and the Honor Harrington series by David Weber.

    23. Favorite romance novel: ???

    24. A book you later found out the author lied about: most things on the NY Times best seller list.

    25. Favorite autobiographical/biographical book: the Autobiography of Benvuento Cellini

    26. A book you wish would be written:

    27. A book you would write if you had all the resources: The Course of Honor: How to become and man, a father and a gentleman.

    28. A book you wish you never read: anything by John Steinbeck

    29. An author that you completely avoid/hate/won’t read: Any of the Bronte sisters

    30. An author that you will read whatever they put out: Victor Davis Hanson, David Drake, Lindsey Graham, John Keegan.

  • scottthebadger

    i have a weak spot for kid’s books from the first quarter of the 20th Century. i have a particular weakness for Ralph of the Railroad, and the Radio Boys series. But I found myself really enjoying this series, The Motor Maids. I bought a lot of kids books at an auction, to get The Radio Boys On The Pacific, and the Motor Maids’ School Days was in the lot. The series is about Wilhelmina, “Billie”, Campbell, and her buddies, as they tear around in her red roadster. . The Motor Maids among Rose, Shamrock, and Thistle has the creepiest illustration I have ever seen in a book, however. The book is set in the Spring of 1914, and Billie and her gang are touring England, Ireland, and Scotland. They stop by Oxford, as the brother of one of the girls is a Rhodes Scholar there. One gal wanders into the wrong frat house, and the picture is of a group of young men surrounding her, in good fellowship. The real graduating class of Oxford, 1914, was almost wiped out in the trenches, so it is a picture of a young woman, surrounded by dead men, who just don’t know that they are dead yet! The Motor Maids in Fair Japan, (1916 ), has Billie and Company marveling at how nice the Japanese are. Given that 17 year old Billie was over there in 1916, if her son, who joined the USMC in 1942, had a different opinion of the Japanese than his Mom had? here is the first book, to get you started : http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/37434

  • Azygos

    “April 3rd, 2014 at 9:31 AM

    I know of the Muddle Puddle Tweetle Poodle Beetle Noodle Bottle Paddle Battle, but fear not! For if you are angered at the Battle, simply stuff that Fox in Socks in that bottle and enjoy the Tweetle Beetle Noodle Poodle Bottled Paddled Muddled Duddled Fuddled Wuddled Fox in Socks, and then have the last laugh :D”

    Are you channeling Joe Biden?

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